The Story of Potoooooooo

Horse racing is certainly no stranger to oddball horse names. Just the other year Horsey McHorseFace (an homage to boaty mcboatface) gained worldwide attention when he won the Lathan Arthur Thompson Memorial Maiden in Australia. Other funny horse names that have raised anything between a titter and a belly laugh include the likes of Hoarse, Hugh Janus,  Oh no it’s my mother in law, magic carpet burns and passing wind.

Funny horse names aren’t just a modern occurrence though. We see that here with a racehorse called Potooooooo born all the way back in 1773. His owner, Willoughby Bertie, already had the bright / strange idea of naming the horse Potatoes. This rather unflattering name was to take another twist though, when Bertie instructed a stable lad to write down the horses name. Instead of writing Potatoes, he wrote down Pot-8-O’s, as in literally the word Pot followed by eight O’s. The owner found this error rather amusing and so instead of correcting it the name stuck. It creates a funny little place for Potoooooooo in history, as the story lives on to this very day!

There’s not many achievements that Richard Johnson hasn’t bagged during his long and illustrious career in racing. From becoming Champion Jockey at just age eighteen in the 1995/6 season, to being awarded an OBE in the new year’s honours for his services to horse racing, he’s done it all.  A Grand National win still eludes him though. Here, speaking to Betway, Johnson steers us through the highs and lows of some of his previous Grand National experiences and lays out the hopes and dreams that are part and parcel of his 2019 Grand National ride on Rock The Kasbah.

Sealing the best price on your Nap of the Day  A lot of horse racing betting is focused on securing the best price on the horse you’re backing, with this mostly being due to the fact that they’re so often placed as singles. Horse racing is a sport that can be altered by so many different factors, making it far harder to bet on than other available sports, but when you’re able to find a horse tip that holds value, it’s easier to see why so many would back it as a single.

 

The primary method of betting on horse singles is through what’s best known as a Nap of the Day. This is a bet that is easily found on horse tipster websites and it’s the benchmark for their success, as it appears every day to show how consistently successful they are with their bets. Naps are a way of identifying the best single horse racing tip throughout all of the current day’s racing action, where the price isn’t a factor that even comes into consideration, with more of a basis on how likely the horse is to win their next race.

 

Why do punters choose to back a nap?

 

It’s unlikely that we will ever find a way of determining certain winners in sports that you can bet on due to sport being so unpredictable to judge, but a bet on the nap of the day is the closest you’ll come to getting a bet that is certain to happen. Nap odds won’t tend to be all too high – often only reaching evens at best – but the primary function of a nap is to harness the mostly likely horse to win rather than finding masses of value.

 

Not only are naps used for betting in singles, but more experienced punters will use individual naps to form doubles, trebles or accumulators, with all selections being equally as likely to win. A nap of the day is one of the easiest horse racing bets to find on the internet, and they should be provided on a daily basis, so if you’re interested in backing a nap, you won’t need to scour the internet from pillar to post in order to find one.

 

Nap of the day odds

 

It can’t be stressed enough how irrelevant the odds are for betting on a nap of the day, as the whole point of them is to find the most likely horse to win even if the odds are as short as 1/10. Although this is always applicable for betting on naps, it isn’t enough to stop a lot of people from attempting to back their nap at the best available bookmaker price.

 

You’re able to enhance your nap odds by merely shopping around on bookmaker websites for the strongest price. If you’re certain over the horse you’ve identified as your nap, you could even back it to win by a few lengths or get behind it at boosted odds where you’re unable to cash out, as each option is used as a way of guaranteeing a bigger price.

3.45 Ayr, Tuesday, January 7  In the Like Racing TV on Facebook Intermediate Open National Hunt Flat Race (3.45) at Ayr on Tuesday, Ribble Valley is likely to encounter slower underfoot conditions than when quickening clear to win a similar race over course and distance by 7 lengths, eased down, on his racecourse debut in November but, that one slight imponderable aside, looks to have plenty going for him. When stepped up Listed level at Cheltenham just over two weeks later, the son of Westerner – who, incidentally, has a 31% winners-runners ratio on soft going – clipped heels with a rival after half a mile, but was outpaced before staying on late to finish sixth of nine, beaten 10¾ lengths. Even so, that form remains respectable in the context of this lesser contest and, with the prevailing soft going possibly more of a help than a hindrance, a return to the winners’ enclosure would be no surprise.

 

Indeed, one of the other penalised runners in the field, Corrieben Reiver, paid Ribble Valley a compliment when winning at Newcastle last month, having finished third of eight, beaten 13 lengths, behind the selection on his racecourse debut. Alistair Whilans’ five-year-old is 7lb better off at the weights, which should mean that he can, at least, make more of a race of it with Ribble Valley this time. Nevertheless, with professional jockey Brian Hughes retaining the ride on Nicky Richards’ six-year-old – who, of course, remains open to any amount of improvement on just his third start – Ribble Valley remains one to be on the right side for the time being.

 

Selection: Ayr 3.45 Ribble Valley to win

12.45 Musselburgh, Monday, November 26  Unfortunately, unseasonably fast ground has led to a dearth of runners up and down the country on Monday, but Musselburgh has fared best, numerically. In the opening Border Safeguard and Security Experts Handicap Hurdle (12.45) at the East Lothian course, it’s interesting that Vale of Glamorgan trainer Tim Vaughan sends both Eric The Third and Fields Of Glory on the 400-mile trek north to contest a race worth just over £3,500 to the winner.

 

The hat-trick-seeking Eric The Third appears the more obvious winner, especially with Charlie Price – former Arabian Racehorse Champion Novice Jockey – taking off 10lb on his return to the smaller obstacles. Indeed, the Mountain High gelding hasn’t run over hurdles since winning a similar race at Uttoxeter, off a 22lb lower mark, in July. He has, of course, won three of his five starts over fences in the interim and, while he must translate his apparent improvement back to this sphere if he’s to win off his revised hurdles mark of 102, he’s still favourably treated when compared with his chase mark of 115. He steps up to 3 miles for the first time, but goes well on top of the ground and must have a decent chance of winning his sixth race of 2018.

 

Vaughan, who has a steady, if unspectacular, 10-60 (17%) strike rate at Musselburgh over the years, also saddles Fields Of Glory, ridden by Alan Johns. His case is less compelling, having finished tailed off on his reappearance at Newton Abbott, by he’s by no means impossibly handicapped on his best hurdling form and, trying a new trip in a first-time visor, might just be worth a small, each-way saver.

 

Selection: Musselburgh 12.45 Eric The Third to win 6/4